Senior Opinion

I love music. So, when looking back at my high school years, it seems fitting to remember my time at Casa in association with the music that I was listening to. My taste grew and changed over the years, however some bops will forever be bangers. Those particular songs that I hold especially dear to me carried me through all four of my slightly miserable and partially exciting high school career. So let’s begin…

Emma Hughes, Reporter

I love music. So, when looking back at my high school years, it seems fitting to remember my time at Casa in association with the music that I was listening to. My taste grew and changed over the years, however some bops will forever be bangers. Those particular songs that I hold especially dear to me carried me through all four of my slightly miserable and partially exciting high school career. So let’s begin…

Freshman Year:

“Burn the House Down” by AJR

Here I was: the fresh meat. I was in high school. Oh. My. God. I was suddenly plummeted to the bottom of the food chain in uncharted territory. I didn’t know what to do or what not to do, where to go or where to stay away from, who to hang out with or who to avoid. Everything changed, yet nothing was really different. I was still me and as far as I knew, all my friends were still them. We were just in high school now. So I coasted. Freshman year was easy all things considered. Sure, I was slightly confused and trying to figure out being a high schooler, but that only lasted a month at most; then it was all rainbows and sunshine as I breezed through the year listening to my jam, “Burn the House Down,” by AJR. The song, much like myself those first couple of weeks back in my freshman year, was full of questions and unknowns. The verses were full of contemplative unsurety, while the chorus was an explosion of instruments and confidence. That was freshman year—confusion, curiosity, then contentment. 

 

Sophomore Year:

“1-800-273-8255” by Logic featuring Alessia Cara and Khalid

Sophomore year, I was sad. Unexplainably so. It was like this cloud that lingered and no matter where I was or what I was doing I felt sad, numb. I didn’t understand it and neither did my friends or family. How could they when I couldn’t even pinpoint why. I was doing everything right, nothing had changed except my mood. I went to school, went to volleyball or softball, went home, did homework, and went to sleep. Then, I woke up and did it all over again. I smiled and laughed when needed, pretending that everything was fine. But it wasn’t, and I didn’t know why. I listened to the song “1-800-273-8255” by Logic featuring Alessia Cara and Khalid on repeat during my sophomore year. The song talked about struggle and suicide and fighting for your future. I felt like I was living the song. I was sad, but I wanted my future. So I fought. I battled my own mind until I was no longer pretending but actually smiling and laughing because I was happy. Sophomore year was a difficult year. I can’t say why exactly, but I can say that I’m glad I fought through it, because now I’m here writing this, looking back on a time where I felt weak and defeated and chose to fight.

 

Junior Year:

“I Think I’m OKAY” by Machine Gun Kelly, Travis Barker, and Yungblud

Junior year was chaotic. It was “The Year,” you know the one that matters most? The one that colleges look at most? So yeah, junior year was all about the grind. Therefore, the song that I most listened to had a fast tempo and strong beat. The song depicts the use of drugs and alcohol which I could not relate to; however, the lines “No sleep, up all week wasting time with people I don’t like” and “You’ll find me alone at midnight / Inside my mind, tryna get things right,” were a pretty good description of junior year. It went by fast with many sleepless nights spent studying. My course work was challenging and my mental health was still recovering from sophomore year, but this song, complete with it’s yelling and graphic language, kept me going to where I always thought, “I Think I’m OKAY.” 

 

Senior Year:

“Serotonin” by girl in red

 

Well I made it, #SeniorSeason. Here’s what I expected of my senior year: late night football games with my friends, volleyball games, homecoming, winter formal, softball games, senior nights, prom in the city, and walking to get my diploma at graduation. Here’s what I got: a global pandemic. Thank you, Covid-19. So clearly, senior year did not go as planned, but ultimately it was a good year. School was online which meant shorter class periods and shorter days and wearing pajamas to class. But it also meant not seeing any of my friends or getting the hands-on education I thought I would. No matter, life goes on. And thanks to “Serotonin” by girl in red, I was able to remain sane through the chaotic year. The song is all about mental health and the intricacies of intrusive thoughts. The main line of the song is “I’m running low on serotonin / Chemical imbalance got me twisting things.” The song explains how when one lacks serotonin—the hormone that stabilizes our mood and happiness— one can have uncontrollable feelings and thoughts. This felt similar to my senior year during the pandemic. I wasn’t sure how to feel. I was grateful to be healthy and still be able to get my education, but I was also disappointed by what my senior year was turning out to be. This song, with its calm, soothing chorus and hectic verses, allowed me to understand that I was allowed to have conflicting feelings. I didn’t have to feel only one thing, so I didn’t. I embraced my final year of high school and took life one day at a time.